records-of-fortune

Art and Architecture - Petra, Jordan. Possibly established in 312 BCE as the capital city of the Nabataeans, it was rapidly built in a Hellenistic style in the 1st century BCE. The city eventually came under Roman rule and began to decline rapidly. The last inhabitants abandoned the city in 663 CE and the site remained a curiosity in the Middle Ages. It remained unknown to the Western world until 1812.

"In fact everything in the picture is slightly estranged. This is where the collage effect really enters. We see a close group of standing figures but they don’t blend together. They are under a strong illumination, but the shadows it casts don’t seem to swallow any of their edges. All these people are clipped and separated, individually shaded. They each look like distinct pieces that have been cut out and overlaid, their blacks and whites bringing out their edges sharply. They overlap like stuck-down layers, with heads and hats and faces peeking out fragmentarily. 
It’s a pictorial effect that affirms Diogenes’ own seeking. In this market place there is no hiding in a busy, blurry crowd. Each individual is picked out for our examination, one by one. (Their faces and finery are given equal clarity, what’s more.) And the concealing-revealing glimpses that the overlappings create make us very conscious of our looking. Our gaze flicks from one bit to another, getting slightly disoriented at points, but always attentive. It’s a picture whose focus hops here – there – there. It never relaxes.” Source

Diogenes Seeks a True Man, Caesar van Everdingen, c.1652

"In fact everything in the picture is slightly estranged. This is where the collage effect really enters. We see a close group of standing figures but they don’t blend together. They are under a strong illumination, but the shadows it casts don’t seem to swallow any of their edges. All these people are clipped and separated, individually shaded. They each look like distinct pieces that have been cut out and overlaid, their blacks and whites bringing out their edges sharply. They overlap like stuck-down layers, with heads and hats and faces peeking out fragmentarily. 

It’s a pictorial effect that affirms Diogenes’ own seeking. In this market place there is no hiding in a busy, blurry crowd. Each individual is picked out for our examination, one by one. (Their faces and finery are given equal clarity, what’s more.) And the concealing-revealing glimpses that the overlappings create make us very conscious of our looking. Our gaze flicks from one bit to another, getting slightly disoriented at points, but always attentive. It’s a picture whose focus hops here – there – there. It never relaxes.” Source

Diogenes Seeks a True Man, Caesar van Everdingen, c.1652