“The work (c. 1506-1508) is the only painting by Michelangelo in Florence and is considered one of the masterpieces of the XVI century Italian art.
During the Renaissance, the “tondo” was a typical work for private clients. It was commissioned by the wealthy banker Agnolo Doni, probably at the time of his marriage to Maddalena, member of the very important Strozzi family.
The figures of Mary, Joseph and the Child, are grouped in a single volume in which the rotation of the Madonna gives the composition a spiral movement that will later be used by many artists. In the background a group of young nudes brings to mind a classic theme, symbolizing the pagan humanity still ignorant of Christian doctrine. It is also interesting to notice the beautiful carved wooden frame, designed by Michelangelo himself.
From the artistic point of view, the Tondo Doni laid the foundations of the so-called Mannerism, the style of painting that preferred bizarre, unnatural poses and iridescent colors to the composed painting of the XV century.
The Tondo Doni is therefore a very important work of art because it is one of the few examples of Michelangelo’s painting, together with the magnificent frescoes in the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel.” Source

Tondo Doni, c.1503, Michelangelo Buonarroti

The work (c. 1506-1508) is the only painting by Michelangelo in Florence and is considered one of the masterpieces of the XVI century Italian art.

During the Renaissance, the “tondo” was a typical work for private clients. It was commissioned by the wealthy banker Agnolo Doni, probably at the time of his marriage to Maddalena, member of the very important Strozzi family.

The figures of Mary, Joseph and the Child, are grouped in a single volume in which the rotation of the Madonna gives the composition a spiral movement that will later be used by many artists. In the background a group of young nudes brings to mind a classic theme, symbolizing the pagan humanity still ignorant of Christian doctrine. It is also interesting to notice the beautiful carved wooden frame, designed by Michelangelo himself.

From the artistic point of view, the Tondo Doni laid the foundations of the so-called Mannerism, the style of painting that preferred bizarre, unnatural poses and iridescent colors to the composed painting of the XV century.

The Tondo Doni is therefore a very important work of art because it is one of the few examples of Michelangelo’s painting, together with the magnificent frescoes in the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel.” Source

Tondo Doni, c.1503, Michelangelo Buonarroti

tiny-librarian
tiny-librarian:


On this day in history, September 5th, in 1638, the future Louis XIV was born at the Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye. His parents, Anne of Austria and Louis XIII, had already been married for 23 years at the time of his birth. The Queen had a series of miscarriages and stillbirths and their relationship was not a good one. Popular gossip attributed this miraculous pregnancy to a single night the King had been forced to spend with her due to bad weather, but in reality the couple had spent a week together at the presumed time their conceived their son.
The birth of a male heir after so long was seen as a gift from God himself, earning the new Dauphin of France the nickname of “Louis-Dieudonne”, meaning Louis the God-given. He would be followed two years later by a brother named Philippe, the future Duke of Orleans.
 Not even five years after his birth, young Louis would ascend the throne of France as Louis XIV. He would go down in history as the “Sun King”, famous for, among many things, building the palace of Versailles, his romantic escapades, and his military exploits. His reign that still stands as the longest of a monarch of a major country in European history

tiny-librarian:

On this day in history, September 5th, in 1638, the future Louis XIV was born at the Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye. His parents, Anne of Austria and Louis XIII, had already been married for 23 years at the time of his birth. The Queen had a series of miscarriages and stillbirths and their relationship was not a good one. Popular gossip attributed this miraculous pregnancy to a single night the King had been forced to spend with her due to bad weather, but in reality the couple had spent a week together at the presumed time their conceived their son.

The birth of a male heir after so long was seen as a gift from God himself, earning the new Dauphin of France the nickname of “Louis-Dieudonne”, meaning Louis the God-given. He would be followed two years later by a brother named Philippe, the future Duke of Orleans.

Not even five years after his birth, young Louis would ascend the throne of France as Louis XIV. He would go down in history as the “Sun King”, famous for, among many things, building the palace of Versailles, his romantic escapades, and his military exploits. His reign that still stands as the longest of a monarch of a major country in European history

renaissance-art

renaissance-art:

Since its creation the Mona Lisa has an object of fascination to artists and audiences alike. Artists even began replicating the iconic painting within Leonardo da Vinci’s lifetime. Da Vinci himself considered it an attempt to paint perfection. Replicas and reinterpretations exist in the thousands and continue to this day as the Mona Lisa is not protected by any copyright laws

1. Leonardo da Vinci c. 1503-1505 

2. Known as the Mona Lisa del Prado c. 16th century

3. Known as the Oslo Copy c. 16th or 17th century

4. Known as the Walters Copy c. 16th Century

5. Known as the Hermitage Copy c. 16th century

6. Jean Ducayer c. 17th century

7. Corot c. 19th century

8. Sapeck c. 1883

9. Salvador Dali c. 1954

10. Graphic Nothing c. 21st century

aquilasaurus

aeneids:

monuments of ancient rome  1/??

Arch of Constantine, 315 CE

This enormous edifice was built along Rome’s triumphal route by the senate and people soon after Emperor Constantine’s victory over Maxentius in 312CE. It represents the beginning of a trend toward the strategic reuse of earlier material (sometimes called spolia) in new monuments in late antiquity. For example, the bearded statues above the columns were taken from Trajan’s Forum, and the round reliefs over the side-arches are from a monument of Hadrian’s time. The narrow, horizontal reliefs running below the roundels, by contrast, were commissioned under Constantine and represent his battles with Maxentius and his triumphal entry into Rome. (x)

The Virgin of the Rocks (sometimes the Madonna of the Rocks) is the name used for two paintings by Leonardo da Vinci, of the same subject, and of a composition which is identical except for several significant details. The version generally considered the prime version, that is the earlier of the two, hangs in The Louvre in Paris and the other in the National Gallery, London. The paintings are both nearly 2 meters (over 6 feet) high and are painted in oils. Both were painted on wooden panel; that in the Louvre has been transferred to canvas.” Source

Normally when we have seen Mary and Christ (in, for example, paintings by Lippi and Giotto), Mary has been enthroned as the queen of heaven. Here, in contrast, we see Mary seated on the ground. This type of representation of Mary is referred to as the Madonna of Humility. Mary has her right arm around the infant Saint John the Baptist who is making a gesture of prayer to the Christ child. The Christ child in turn blesses St. John. Mary’s left hand hovers protectively over the head of her son while an angel looks out and points to St. John. The figures are all located in a fabulous and mystical landscape with rivers that seem to lead nowhere and bizarre rock formations. In the foreground we see carefully observed and precisely rendered plants and flowers.

We immediately notice Mary’s ideal beauty and the graceful way in which she moves, features typical of the High Renaissance” Source

archaicwonder
archaicwonder:
The Wedding of Ariadne, Roman mosaic, 2nd century AD

Ariadne is the daughter of King Minos of Crete, She helped Theseus slay the Minotaur while he was on the island and then fled with him when he sailed for home. However, they stopped on the island of Naxos and Theseus promptly abandoned her while she slept. It was here where Dionysos found her and made her his wife. There are many versions of Ariadne’s mythology in addition to this one. 
More about Ariadne…

archaicwonder:

The Wedding of Ariadne, Roman mosaic, 2nd century AD

Ariadne is the daughter of King Minos of Crete, She helped Theseus slay the Minotaur while he was on the island and then fled with him when he sailed for home. However, they stopped on the island of Naxos and Theseus promptly abandoned her while she slept. It was here where Dionysos found her and made her his wife. There are many versions of Ariadne’s mythology in addition to this one. 

More about Ariadne…

The only secular frescoes by Botticelli that still exist were discovered 1873, in the Villa Lemmi, at the foot of the Careggi Hill, close to a villa of Cosimo de Medici. They had been concealed under old coats of paint for centuries. Villa Lemmi belonged to the Tornabuoni family, friend of the Medici. It is supposed the frescoes were executed to commemorate the marriage of Lorenzo Tornabuoni and Giovanna degli Albizzi.

The frescoes are in a very poor state of preservation, because they were damaged when taken down from the wall. Two of the three fragments found were transferred to canvas and later sold to the Louvre in Paris. The two compositions were originally separated only by a window.

One of the fragments probably represents Venus and the Three Graces Presenting Gifts to a Young Woman, the other A Young Man Being Introduced to the Seven Liberal Arts.

Even in this poor condition, the two frescoes still have some of the elegance which is the feature of Botticelli’s best compositions. The fact that the figures cannot be entirely identified in no way detracts from their distant charm. It is, however, assumed that this is an allegorical celebration for a newly married couple. Even though the young man is obviously being led towards the female allegories of the seven liberal arts, rhetoric, dialectics, arithmetic, grammar, geometry, astronomy and music, it is unclear who is leading him there.” Source

“There are seven figures in the painting: from left to right they are St John, Jesus, Judas, two soldiers, a man (a self-portrait of Caravaggio), and another soldier. They are standing, and only the upper three-quarters of their bodies are depicted. The figures are arrayed before a very dark background, in which the setting is disguised. The main light source is not evident in the painting but comes from the upper left. There is a lantern being held by the man at the right (Caravaggio). At the far left, a man (St John) is fleeing; his arms are raised, his mouth is open in a gasp, his cloak is flying and being snatched back by a soldier. The flight of the terrified John contrasts with the entrance of the artist; scholars claim that Caravaggio is making the point that even a sinner one thousand years after the resurrection has a better understanding of Christ than does his friend. Two of the more puzzling details of the painting are, one, the fact that the heads of Jesus and St. John seem to visually meld together in the upper left corner, and, two, the fact of the prominent presence, in the very center of the canvas and in foremost plane of the picture, of the arresting officer’s highly polished, metal-clad arm.” Source

The taking of Christ, Caravaggio, c.1602

There are seven figures in the painting: from left to right they are St JohnJesusJudas, two soldiers, a man (a self-portrait of Caravaggio), and another soldier. They are standing, and only the upper three-quarters of their bodies are depicted. The figures are arrayed before a very dark background, in which the setting is disguised. The main light source is not evident in the painting but comes from the upper left. There is a lantern being held by the man at the right (Caravaggio). At the far left, a man (St John) is fleeing; his arms are raised, his mouth is open in a gasp, his cloak is flying and being snatched back by a soldier. The flight of the terrified John contrasts with the entrance of the artist; scholars claim that Caravaggio is making the point that even a sinner one thousand years after the resurrection has a better understanding of Christ than does his friend. Two of the more puzzling details of the painting are, one, the fact that the heads of Jesus and St. John seem to visually meld together in the upper left corner, and, two, the fact of the prominent presence, in the very center of the canvas and in foremost plane of the picture, of the arresting officer’s highly polished, metal-clad arm.” Source

The taking of Christ, Caravaggio, c.1602