“There are seven figures in the painting: from left to right they are St John, Jesus, Judas, two soldiers, a man (a self-portrait of Caravaggio), and another soldier. They are standing, and only the upper three-quarters of their bodies are depicted. The figures are arrayed before a very dark background, in which the setting is disguised. The main light source is not evident in the painting but comes from the upper left. There is a lantern being held by the man at the right (Caravaggio). At the far left, a man (St John) is fleeing; his arms are raised, his mouth is open in a gasp, his cloak is flying and being snatched back by a soldier. The flight of the terrified John contrasts with the entrance of the artist; scholars claim that Caravaggio is making the point that even a sinner one thousand years after the resurrection has a better understanding of Christ than does his friend. Two of the more puzzling details of the painting are, one, the fact that the heads of Jesus and St. John seem to visually meld together in the upper left corner, and, two, the fact of the prominent presence, in the very center of the canvas and in foremost plane of the picture, of the arresting officer’s highly polished, metal-clad arm.” Source

The taking of Christ, Caravaggio, c.1602

There are seven figures in the painting: from left to right they are St JohnJesusJudas, two soldiers, a man (a self-portrait of Caravaggio), and another soldier. They are standing, and only the upper three-quarters of their bodies are depicted. The figures are arrayed before a very dark background, in which the setting is disguised. The main light source is not evident in the painting but comes from the upper left. There is a lantern being held by the man at the right (Caravaggio). At the far left, a man (St John) is fleeing; his arms are raised, his mouth is open in a gasp, his cloak is flying and being snatched back by a soldier. The flight of the terrified John contrasts with the entrance of the artist; scholars claim that Caravaggio is making the point that even a sinner one thousand years after the resurrection has a better understanding of Christ than does his friend. Two of the more puzzling details of the painting are, one, the fact that the heads of Jesus and St. John seem to visually meld together in the upper left corner, and, two, the fact of the prominent presence, in the very center of the canvas and in foremost plane of the picture, of the arresting officer’s highly polished, metal-clad arm.” Source

The taking of Christ, Caravaggio, c.1602

"When the French captured Milan in September 1499 Bramante fled to Rome, where he frescoed the arms of Pope Alexander VI at St. John Lateran, in preparation for the Holy Year of 1500, and explored the Roman antiquities. The impact of the ancient monuments is evident in his cloister of S. Maria della Pace in Rome (1500-1504). The simple gravity and monumentality of the small square court marks a distinct break with the Lombard style and foreshadows the new classicism of High Renaissance Rome. The ground-floor arcade is supported on piers with engaged Ionic pilasters; the upper floor alternates Corinthian columns and piers bearing an architrave.

The tiny circular Tempietto at S. Pietro in Montorio, in Rome (1502), with a Doric colonnade surrounding a small cella closed by a semicircular dome on a tall drum, represents the perfection of Bramante’s Roman style. The architect intended the chapel to stand in the center of a circular, colonnaded court to emphasize its self-containment and centralization, but the court was never executed.” Source

Cloister of Santa Maria della Pace, c.1500

Tempietto of San Pietro in Montorio, c.1502

Donato Bramante (1443/4-1514)

ancientart

ancientart:

The lion hunts of Ashurbanipal -details from the hall reliefs of the Palace at Ninevah

Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, who reigned 669-630 BCE, is shown in the first detail to be aiming his bow and arrow atop a chariot. The second image displays an arrow of his shot, flying in mid-air towards a lion. A close-up of Ashurbanipal is given in the final photograph to present the immense detail of these reliefs, for instance, note the intricate carvings which cover his clothing.

Artefacts courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photos taken by Steven Zucker.

renaissance-art

renaissance-art:

Andrea Mantegna c. 1465-1475

Self Portrait

Found in the Ducal Palace of Mantua, where Mantegna completed the frescoes of the Camera delgi Sposi is a hidden dedication by the artist. A self portrait was inserted within the foliage above the door of the west wall. The likeness of the work is confirmed through the similarities of his bronze portrait bust of 1490. This is not the only self-portrait in Mantegna’s work as he can also be found in his 1460, Presentation in the Temple

peterquill

art history meme | 1/5 movements: pre-raphaelism

In the late 1840s, the exclusively British Pre-Raphaelite movement appeared in Victorian society in London. Three young students from the Royal Academy were the instigators - William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. At that time, British painting was at an impasse, pinned down by strict conventions and restricted by the tastes of a clientele that delighted in small genre scenes, usually full of mawkish sentimentality and conveying a moral message. In their view, it was academic teaching, unable to free itself from the aesthetic rules set down in the Renaissance, that was directly responsible for this creative sclerosis. Together they founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848. They chose the name as a reminder that the group would concentrate its criticism on a painting by Raphael, The Transfiguration. Hunt said it “should be condemned for its grandiose disregard of the simplicity of truth, the pompous posturing of the apostles and the unspiritual posture of the Saviour.” They wanted to return to art as it had been before Raphael, free from all academic affectation.